0300 323 0405

info@avenuesgroup.org.uk

Adults

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Avenues started out in 1993 working with adults who had been patients in long stay hospitals. Today much of our work is still with people aged over 18. We are experts in supporting adults whose complex needs stem from learning disability, autism, or acquired brain injury or associated challenging behaviour. Often, the adults we support are dealing with more than one set of support needs, whether related to physical or emotional wellbeing.

Our support incorporates a number of techniques and approaches that are known to improve outcomes, reduce support needs over time and lead to better lives for people. These include person-centred active support and positive behaviour support. We pride ourselves on knowing our support workers have the right personality, excellent training and the right support they themselves need to do a great job.

Adults with support needs will most likely have had contact with other services when we are introduced to them. This might be as a resident or patient in a residential service or hospital or as a tenant in a supported living service that might no longer be quite right for them. Someone may be moving into their own home for the first time, a placement may have broken down, someone’s support needs may have changed, or they might be looking to move closer to home or where friends and family are.

Whatever the circumstances, we respond by getting to know someone so that we can plan a support package according to what is important for them at that time. We appreciate that younger adults and older people can have different aims and expectations so we may shape our support packages in different ways – whether that’s number of hours, location or type of activity. In some areas we also provide an advice and advocacy service to help people get the most out of their lives and what is available to them.

Want to know more?

Contact us or download a brochure:

Services for people with behaviour that challenges

Services for people with acquired brain injury